(Source: bzzbzzwhrrlclick)



(Source: necessaryveganism)



professor-zun:

xblackwolfblueeyesx:

Hey vegans, you know how some of you wont even drink milk because it comes from animals? News flash: you’re doing more harm than good. Cows that dont get milked could have their utters explode and be in tremendous agony. Way to go, you guys.

Cows that don’t get milked by humans have a thing called a “baby” that drinks the milk. You know, just like with all other mammals (such as humans, donkeys, or cats, for example).

You do know that cows only ever even produce milk after they had a baby, right? No baby, no milk.

Dairy farmers forcefully impregnate the cows (shoving their arms all into their business), and then when the calf is born they take the baby away to be slaughtered if it’s a boy (this is called “veal”, it’s a dead baby cow) or to be raised as a new dairy cow if it’s a girl, so that nobody drinks the mother’s milk and humans can take it to put in the supermarket for you to buy.

Dairy cows have to be forcefully impregnated every year or so, to keep giving milk, and they give birth to 4-5 babies that get taken away from them, before they themselves get killed and made into a burger.

Udders do not explode. There are ways to ease natural milk production in case of a calf’s death, for example.

Dairy cows are also given bovine growth hormones, so they produce more milk and this stretches their udders painfully so. Stop the hormones and milk production will go down as well.

Vegans are against all that. We are against killing baby cows, we are against forcibly impregnating mothers, we are against giving animals hormones that make them grow unnaturally and become sick.

That is why we don’t drink milk.





the-southern-dandy:

nobullnobucksvegan:

heyfranhey:

cheapveg:

The Cheap Vegan Pantry: What You Need and What Must Go
So you decided to start eating healthy and maybe even vegan but you’re worried about staying on track. One way to guarantee you won’t slip up is to clean out those temptation items and restock the pantry.
So first determine a goal
 The Cheap Vegan Goal: The goal of this blog is to provide ways for people to eat healthy and vegan on a low budget. The posts I write tend to be focused on eating whole (non processed) foods affordably while getting the daily recommended nutrients. This pantry guide will reflect that.
What Can Stay
When you’re going through your pantry look at each item and ask yourself these questions:
Are all ingredients vegan? (list of non-vegan ingredients here) 
Do I know what each of these ingredients are?
 Could I find all of these ingredients in nature?
 Are there less than 10g of sugar in a suggested serving of this food?
Is this an unprocessed whole food?
Is this caffeine free?
Can I cook normally without this food?*
If your answer to all these questions is “yes” then it’s 100% good to go.
If you had to answer “no” to 1 or more of these questions, you need to evaluate if that item is worth keeping. Being truly conscious of what your eating is the first step to eating healthier. Knowing that you don’t know the last 20 items in the oreo’s ingredients list might help you think twice before eating one again.
**If you answered “no” to 3/6 of the questions and you answered “yes” to number 7, chuck it. It’s not like you can never eat those foods again, but keeping them out of your house will help you cut down.
Also Note: Some items such as sugar for baking are a little different. You might want to get rid of white sugar and switch to raw sugar or agave, but you might not find it necessary to eliminate all sugar from your life.
That brings us to alterations. Taking our favorite staples and upgrading them.
White pasta -> Whole Wheat Pasta or Ezekiel  Pasta
White Flour -> Whole Wheat Flour or Buckwheat Flour
White Sugar -> Agave Nectar, Raw Sugar, Unsweetened Apple Sauce
White Rice/Cous Cous -> Brown Rice, Quinoa Seeds
Vegetable Oil -> Extra Virgin Olive Oil (salad) Virgin Olive Oil (sautee) Canola Oil (high heat)
Table Salt -> Sea Salt
I’m not going to mislead you, some of these ingredients are slightly more expensive than their less-healthy counterparts, but the extra $1 is worth your health. These are the basic building blocks of all of your meals, save money on the perishable stuff you have to buy weekly.
Now that you’ve tossed and exchanged, here are some cheap vegan basics:
Must Have Shopping List!
Nutritional Yeast - A great source of vitamin B12, a great unique flavor, great for satisfying those cheesy cravings.
Cashews and Walnuts - Nuts are a great source of protein and cashews are in a lot of vegan recipes, especially raw vegans. Walnuts are a vegan source of Omega 3s and are great in salads and stir fry. Having some nuts to throw in to a meal is always a good choice, not to mention a quick fix when you want a snack.
Brown Rice
Whole Wheat Pasta
Quinoa - Learn more about quinoa here.
Beans - Beans are a great source of protein, fiber, and iron. Stock up on a variety of beans/legumes so you can see what works for you and keep what you like. If you’re not a big fan of beans learn to like them by using some Cheap Vegan tricks found here.
Whole Wheat Flour
Herbs and Spices - Here are the basic must haves: Basil*, Cilantro*, Oregano*, Thyme*, Cumin, Cinnamon, Black Pepper, Cayenne Pepper/Crushed Red Pepper, Chilli Powder, Garlic Powder, Onion Powder (**spices are expensive, growing an herb garden with these plants will definitely save you money and add class your meals)
(Extra) Virgin Olive Oil - Oil is expensive. Buy a giant bottle of Olive Oil at BJs or Costco and then refill an olive oil drizzler to cut down on waste and save money.
Unsweetened Apple Sauce - Use as a sweetener or an egg replacer in baking.
Granola - Can be used as a snack, breakfast, or even dessert. Granola is a great staple to keeping you full and is a nice replacement for a sweet treat.
Vegetable Bouillon Cubes - Great flavor booster.
Ener-G Egg Replacer - Great for baking, pancakes, and an emergency thickener.
Corn Starch - A must have thickener for all types of sauces and soups.
B-12 Vegetarian Supplement - B12 is very important for vegans to keep track of since you can only find it in animal food sources. Many cereals and drinks are fortified with B-12 but it’s good to take a vegan daily vitamin to be sure you’re getting enough.
Onions and Garlic
Oat Meal - Use in baking or for breakfast.
Potatoes - Preferably small red, purple, or other colorful potatoes.
Sea Salt
Hot Sauce - If all else fails during your kitchen experiments, it’s always nice to have some Cholula on hand to spice up a meal.
Next Step: Buying Food to Match Your New Basics
While you’re at the grocery store keep the same questions in mind. If you would have thrown it out when you renovated your pantry, don’t buy it now! Eventually you’ll learn what works for you. And always…
Buy store brands to save money.
Try to buy unprocessed whole foods. You’ll find that cooking with only whole foods is surprisingly cheaper than buying processed or pre-made food.
If you’re budget is truly tight, don’t waste money on fake meats and other processed vegan foods. They’re usually more expensive. Try making your own home made.
Shop often to ensure you are getting fresh foods and not throwing away your wasted food and money! Always remember, it’s worth your time to eat well.

Even if you’re not vegan, these are still dope cleaning eating options to consider next time you go grocery shopping! Give your body a nice (nutrient-rich) break some days. Your mind will become so sharp. More energy. Clarity. Health is wealth.

These are good tips for someone who is trying to budget to save up for something like a vacation, their education, a large present for someone they love. Quite a few of these tips can’t apply to low-income/poor vegans, especially the recommendation of buying and regularly using nuts, regularly purchasing a multivitamin supplement, extra virgin olive oil, agave nectar, or limiting your purchases to “what can be found in nature” (as well as appealing to the naturalistic fallacy).

seriously? agave? not only is is more expensive than what sugar, it’s also wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy worse for you. (Did I mention that agave is the absolute WORST sweetener you can consume, yeah, that’s right, even worse than that highly dubious high fructose corn syrup. Put that on your pancakes and chew that over for a little.) Instead try raw sugar or cane sugar.
AND THIS FUCKING B12 MYTH, JESUS FUCKING HELL PEOPLE ARE YOU SO OUT OF DATE THAT YOU CAN’T USE GOOGLE?
TRY IT
GOOGLE.COM
B12
READ THAT SHIT
because you DEFINITELY don’t need b12 supplements unless you have some illness that your body can’t produce its own or you eat ONLY meat. B12 occurs naturally in almost all whole foods that was grown in the ground, but is cooked out around 160’F (ie. ANY cooked meat contains NO B12). B12 is produced by little organisms found in water, soil, and, yep, you guessed it, YOUR OWN FUCKING BODY. Maintaining a healthy digestive system is paramount to producing B12 (ie BEING A FUCKING HEALTHY ASS VEGAN). Guess what encourages B12 production in your body? Leafy greens and fiber from plants (oh shit, which already contain B12 because you’re buying nice whole food produce, right? Damn, girl, seems like you’re setup and ready to go!)
The more you know

Are YOU THAT OUT OF DATE? Just because you googled it, doesn’t mean it’s true, come on.Try some legitimate sources like studies or vegan nutritionists and doctors, like Michael Greger  or Jack Norris. Not spirulina producers.There is NO B12 in plants. It’s just wishful thinking. I know you probably read a lot about vegan diet and how it gives you every nutrient you need and how it’s the best and healthiest thing in the universe, but unfortunately, though veganism is great for you, it requires B12 supplementation. You can twist the information all you want, but scientific studies give us the facts, and the facts are - plants don’t contain B12. Please stop endangering people’s health by misleading them. VEGANS NEED TO GET B12 BY SUPPLEMENTATION OR BY EATING B12 FORTIFIED FOODS!

the-southern-dandy:

nobullnobucksvegan:

heyfranhey:

cheapveg:

The Cheap Vegan Pantry: What You Need and What Must Go

So you decided to start eating healthy and maybe even vegan but you’re worried about staying on track. One way to guarantee you won’t slip up is to clean out those temptation items and restock the pantry.

So first determine a goal

The Cheap Vegan Goal: The goal of this blog is to provide ways for people to eat healthy and vegan on a low budget. The posts I write tend to be focused on eating whole (non processed) foods affordably while getting the daily recommended nutrients. This pantry guide will reflect that.

What Can Stay

When you’re going through your pantry look at each item and ask yourself these questions:

  1. Are all ingredients vegan? (list of non-vegan ingredients here)
  2. Do I know what each of these ingredients are?
  3. Could I find all of these ingredients in nature?
  4. Are there less than 10g of sugar in a suggested serving of this food?
  5. Is this an unprocessed whole food?
  6. Is this caffeine free?
  7. Can I cook normally without this food?*

If your answer to all these questions is “yes” then it’s 100% good to go.

If you had to answer “no” to 1 or more of these questions, you need to evaluate if that item is worth keeping. Being truly conscious of what your eating is the first step to eating healthier. Knowing that you don’t know the last 20 items in the oreo’s ingredients list might help you think twice before eating one again.

**If you answered “no” to 3/6 of the questions and you answered “yes” to number 7, chuck it. It’s not like you can never eat those foods again, but keeping them out of your house will help you cut down.

Also Note: Some items such as sugar for baking are a little different. You might want to get rid of white sugar and switch to raw sugar or agave, but you might not find it necessary to eliminate all sugar from your life.

That brings us to alterations. Taking our favorite staples and upgrading them.

  • White pasta -> Whole Wheat Pasta or Ezekiel  Pasta
  • White Flour -> Whole Wheat Flour or Buckwheat Flour
  • White Sugar -> Agave Nectar, Raw Sugar, Unsweetened Apple Sauce
  • White Rice/Cous Cous -> Brown Rice, Quinoa Seeds
  • Vegetable Oil -> Extra Virgin Olive Oil (salad) Virgin Olive Oil (sautee) Canola Oil (high heat)
  • Table Salt -> Sea Salt

I’m not going to mislead you, some of these ingredients are slightly more expensive than their less-healthy counterparts, but the extra $1 is worth your health. These are the basic building blocks of all of your meals, save money on the perishable stuff you have to buy weekly.

Now that you’ve tossed and exchanged, here are some cheap vegan basics:

Must Have Shopping List!

  1. Nutritional Yeast - A great source of vitamin B12, a great unique flavor, great for satisfying those cheesy cravings.
  2. Cashews and Walnuts - Nuts are a great source of protein and cashews are in a lot of vegan recipes, especially raw vegans. Walnuts are a vegan source of Omega 3s and are great in salads and stir fry. Having some nuts to throw in to a meal is always a good choice, not to mention a quick fix when you want a snack.
  3. Brown Rice
  4. Whole Wheat Pasta
  5. Quinoa - Learn more about quinoa here.
  6. Beans - Beans are a great source of protein, fiber, and iron. Stock up on a variety of beans/legumes so you can see what works for you and keep what you like. If you’re not a big fan of beans learn to like them by using some Cheap Vegan tricks found here.
  7. Whole Wheat Flour
  8. Herbs and Spices - Here are the basic must haves: Basil*, Cilantro*, Oregano*, Thyme*, Cumin, Cinnamon, Black Pepper, Cayenne Pepper/Crushed Red Pepper, Chilli Powder, Garlic Powder, Onion Powder (**spices are expensive, growing an herb garden with these plants will definitely save you money and add class your meals)
  9. (Extra) Virgin Olive Oil - Oil is expensive. Buy a giant bottle of Olive Oil at BJs or Costco and then refill an olive oil drizzler to cut down on waste and save money.
  10. Unsweetened Apple Sauce - Use as a sweetener or an egg replacer in baking.
  11. Granola - Can be used as a snack, breakfast, or even dessert. Granola is a great staple to keeping you full and is a nice replacement for a sweet treat.
  12. Vegetable Bouillon Cubes - Great flavor booster.
  13. Ener-G Egg Replacer - Great for baking, pancakes, and an emergency thickener.
  14. Corn Starch - A must have thickener for all types of sauces and soups.
  15. B-12 Vegetarian Supplement - B12 is very important for vegans to keep track of since you can only find it in animal food sources. Many cereals and drinks are fortified with B-12 but it’s good to take a vegan daily vitamin to be sure you’re getting enough.
  16. Onions and Garlic
  17. Oat Meal - Use in baking or for breakfast.
  18. Potatoes - Preferably small red, purple, or other colorful potatoes.
  19. Sea Salt
  20. Hot Sauce - If all else fails during your kitchen experiments, it’s always nice to have some Cholula on hand to spice up a meal.

Next Step: Buying Food to Match Your New Basics

While you’re at the grocery store keep the same questions in mind. If you would have thrown it out when you renovated your pantry, don’t buy it now! Eventually you’ll learn what works for you. And always…

  • Buy store brands to save money.
  • Try to buy unprocessed whole foods. You’ll find that cooking with only whole foods is surprisingly cheaper than buying processed or pre-made food.
  • If you’re budget is truly tight, don’t waste money on fake meats and other processed vegan foods. They’re usually more expensive. Try making your own home made.
  • Shop often to ensure you are getting fresh foods and not throwing away your wasted food and money! Always remember, it’s worth your time to eat well.

Even if you’re not vegan, these are still dope cleaning eating options to consider next time you go grocery shopping! Give your body a nice (nutrient-rich) break some days. Your mind will become so sharp. More energy. Clarity. Health is wealth.

These are good tips for someone who is trying to budget to save up for something like a vacation, their education, a large present for someone they love. Quite a few of these tips can’t apply to low-income/poor vegans, especially the recommendation of buying and regularly using nuts, regularly purchasing a multivitamin supplement, extra virgin olive oil, agave nectar, or limiting your purchases to “what can be found in nature” (as well as appealing to the naturalistic fallacy).

seriously? agave? not only is is more expensive than what sugar, it’s also wayyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy worse for you. (Did I mention that agave is the absolute WORST sweetener you can consume, yeah, that’s right, even worse than that highly dubious high fructose corn syrup. Put that on your pancakes and chew that over for a little.) Instead try raw sugar or cane sugar.

AND THIS FUCKING B12 MYTH, JESUS FUCKING HELL PEOPLE ARE YOU SO OUT OF DATE THAT YOU CAN’T USE GOOGLE?

TRY IT

GOOGLE.COM

B12

READ THAT SHIT

because you DEFINITELY don’t need b12 supplements unless you have some illness that your body can’t produce its own or you eat ONLY meat. B12 occurs naturally in almost all whole foods that was grown in the ground, but is cooked out around 160’F (ie. ANY cooked meat contains NO B12). B12 is produced by little organisms found in water, soil, and, yep, you guessed it, YOUR OWN FUCKING BODY. Maintaining a healthy digestive system is paramount to producing B12 (ie BEING A FUCKING HEALTHY ASS VEGAN). Guess what encourages B12 production in your body? Leafy greens and fiber from plants (oh shit, which already contain B12 because you’re buying nice whole food produce, right? Damn, girl, seems like you’re setup and ready to go!)

The more you know

Are YOU THAT OUT OF DATE? 

Just because you googled it, doesn’t mean it’s true, come on.
Try some legitimate sources like studies or vegan nutritionists and doctors, like Michael Greger  or Jack Norris. Not spirulina producers.

There is NO B12 in plants. It’s just wishful thinking. I know you probably read a lot about vegan diet and how it gives you every nutrient you need and how it’s the best and healthiest thing in the universe, but unfortunately, though veganism is great for you, it requires B12 supplementation. You can twist the information all you want, but scientific studies give us the facts, and the facts are - plants don’t contain B12. Please stop endangering people’s health by misleading them. 

VEGANS NEED TO GET B12 BY SUPPLEMENTATION OR BY EATING B12 FORTIFIED FOODS!



(Source: foalsperm)



Anonymous asked:
why do you call yourself an environmentalist if you don't oppose GMOs?

veganshithead:

pitter—patter:

veganshithead:

veganmisanthrope:

I always appreciate a rational stance on GMOs.  It’s especially good to hear such things from a fellow vegan :)

I would really like to see some sources on GMOs having higher yields. Unless I’m mistaken, most genetically modified plant foods these days have a history of crop yield decreasing and less nutrients when tested.

Additionally, we can feed our current population on less land than is currently used if we stop doing monoculture crops, stop feeding those monoculture crops to cattle and pigs instead of human beings, and employ sustainable practices such as permaculture… and space saving tactics like vertical and urban gardening would help matters, as well.

GMOs a) make money for large, corrupt corporations (Monsanto?), b) are often harmful to the world around them (outcompeting native/non-GM species, being engineered to kill insects and other pests, requiring more [monsanto manufactured] chemical spraying, requiring monoculture to thrive, etc.), and c) have little actual benefit in the long run when compared to sustainable farming techniques that can be put into place now, without blasting away chunks of DNA in a lab.

I also am really not sure I trust a human scientist to know the exact effects brought about by knocking out chunks of DNA and replacing them with genetic material that alters the plant in ways that we don’t fully understand. And I’m sure I don’t trust a capitalist-backed corporation to have everyone else’s best interests in mind… and that’s where these scientists are employed.

I am not and will not be comfortable with genetic modification because humans are flawed, and we have a tendency to assume we know everything when we really don’t. Hubris is far better represented in our species’ history than foresight.

Now this is just a quick google, but here are two sources (1, 2) for the higher yield thing :).

Like I said, food forests and food sovereignty are important movements and tbh I like them more than the GMO movement but I feel like it’s possible for all of them to be utilised in non-harmful ways for the benefit of all.  I don’t dislike GMOs because they are used by ‘bad guys’, I think they have a lot of potential and possible good applications.  I do have other preferences. 

Hence, in conclusion, I’m not against GMOs.

A report released this year, taking into account 15 years of GM soy crop information, says otherwise.

The seeds are patented and cost more than conventional seeds - the price of GMO soybean and corn seeds grew by about 50 percent between 2001 and 2010, according to the report. But the companies that sell them say they make weed and insect management easier for farmers and can help increase production.

But in its report, the ERS researchers said over the first 15 years of commercial use, GMO seeds have not been shown to definitively increase yield potentials, and “in fact, the yields of herbicide-tolerant or insect-resistant seeds may be occasionally lower than the yields of conventional varieties,” the ERS report states.

Also from the same article: 

pitter--patter:

Because mainting purity is not as important as maintaining life I guess?  I’m fine with foods being changed to provide more nutrients to people in need who might otherwise suffer.  So long as these organisms are known to cause no ill effects I’m not sure what the problem could be?

Unless you’re worried about contamination between GMOs and non-GMOs?  But then isn’t that only an issue between, for example, GMO wheat and non-GMO wheat, which is likely not native to many places?  So is it the native-ness of things that is in question or is it the simple fact that we are manipulating organisms (I’m talking plants here obvs) to provide for our increasing population?  Of course I’m more into food sovereignty than GMOs but given the option of something with a higher yield and lower use of resources (GMO) or a native hard-to-crow crop, I’ma go with the GMO, so long as land isn’t cleared irresponsibly.  I’d much rather we had food forests but I’m not sure how viable that is for our current population levels?

I’d be interested to hear your side :).

But while insecticide use has gone down, herbicide use on GMO corn is rising, the report states. Herbicide use on GMO corn increased from around 1.5 pounds per planted acre in 2001 to more than 2.0 pounds per planted acre in 2010. Herbicide use on non-GMO corn has remained relatively level during that same time frame, the ERS said.

And the over reliance on glyphosate has translated to an increase in weed resistance, which makes crop production much harder. Glyphosate is the chief ingredient in Roundup herbicide sold by Monsanto, and its use has translated to the glyphosate resistance seen in 14 weed species and biotypes in the United States, according to ERS.

And another article on the same report, just for good measure.

Here’s an article that really sheds some light on what I mean when I say human scientists do not know enough to be doing the kind of genetic modification they’re engaged in right now. They don’t know the effects of what they’re doing, because they don’t understand exactly how DNA works. We’re simply not prepared to know every effect this kind of experimentation is going to have… and since there are other options (I wouldn’t call GMOs a movement, as they’re entirely corporate backed), we really shouldn’t be supporting one that has these kind of massive flaws.

This article about BT cotton in India illustrates a lot of problems… resistance, Monsanto says, is to be expected. That means more and more different toxins and pesticides and herbicides. That means a steady paycheck for Monsanto and a world dependent on their products.
Make no mistake. This isn’t about “feeding the world,” this is about turning a profit. And where profit is the goal, helping others has to take a back seat to making more money.

I’m alarmed by your use of quotation marks around “bad guys,” honestly. If Monsanto—the people who gave us Agent Orange, are currently in the process of monopolizing food production from the farm up, and who sue farmers into bankruptcy for “stealing” when their fields are contaminated against their wishes with GM crops—aren’t the bad guys in your eyes, we disagree on something far more fundamental than genetically modified crops.

I noticed that you tagged your post that you would not reply any more, but… if you’re going to have an opinion on a topic this serious, perhaps discussion and full understanding is in order. I could be wrong about this… I don’t think I am, but if I don’t look any further than my current view, how could I know?

I’m just going to say that dailymail isn’t a credible source of information, and global research is known for reinforcing conspiracy theories. 
The science says it, GMOs and safe and can be very beneficial, see here. What Monsanto does should not be used as a criticism of GMOs. GMOs can be used as a tool to take advantage of people (in this case farmers) but so can thousands of other things. It’s capitalism you should be blaming, not GMOs.





Anonymous asked:
why do you call yourself an environmentalist if you don't oppose GMOs?

pitter--patter:

Because mainting purity is not as important as maintaining life I guess?  I’m fine with foods being changed to provide more nutrients to people in need who might otherwise suffer.  So long as these organisms are known to cause no ill effects I’m not sure what the problem could be?

Unless you’re worried about contamination between GMOs and non-GMOs?  But then isn’t that only an issue between, for example, GMO wheat and non-GMO wheat, which is likely not native to many places?  So is it the native-ness of things that is in question or is it the simple fact that we are manipulating organisms (I’m talking plants here obvs) to provide for our increasing population?  Of course I’m more into food sovereignty than GMOs but given the option of something with a higher yield and lower use of resources (GMO) or a native hard-to-crow crop, I’ma go with the GMO, so long as land isn’t cleared irresponsibly.  I’d much rather we had food forests but I’m not sure how viable that is for our current population levels?

I’d be interested to hear your side :).

I always appreciate a rational stance on GMOs.  It’s especially good to hear such things from a fellow vegan :)






jayfcuksakes:

christopher1001:

earthandanimals:

onlylolgifs:

Penguins Grieving

I’m crying.

This is like the saddest shit I’ve seen on tumblr since I been here

My heart is hurting




nataliemeansnice:

same

(Source: lolgifs.net)



badass-explosions:

This is so fucking badass. 

I want this on my wall

badass-explosions:

This is so fucking badass. 

I want this on my wall



can we talk about the phrase “earn a living” and how deeply fucked up the idea we’re expected to justify our existence through work and wages is though?

(Source: queerandpresentdanger)






I love Transformers so please be warned that I will be reblogging a lot of Age of Extinction stuff in the upcoming few days. 

I love Transformers so please be warned that I will be reblogging a lot of Age of Extinction stuff in the upcoming few days. 



girlwiththegreenhat:

Headcanon.

girlwiththegreenhat:

Headcanon.